From cutting board to pot

The vast majority of what we eat, we prepare ourselves. It’s healthy; nutritious; tasty; the way to control ingredients; and a very important skill/art to engage in.

DSCF0426 - Copy

Dinner on the way. Clockwise from top: garlic; roast pork loin; potato; carrot; onion. Offstage and waiting to play their parts: salt and pepper; turkey stock; crushed tomatoes; Hatch green chilies;  ground cumin.

DSCF0428 - Copy

It’s quite good.

I will return on Thursday.

Stocked

We try to keep our pantry and freezer reasonably stocked.

DSCF0423 - CopyDSCF0417 - Copy

Having a stocked larder makes it easier to come up with tasty and nutritious meals that we like. A well stocked larder simplifies the task of preparing one of our go-to recipes or trying something new.

DSCF0418 - Copy

Extras and leftovers go into freezer bags or yogurt containers so we can either have a quick dinner or whip up a lunch to take to work. We do not regularly buy lunch at work. While Fayes’ workplace has a good cafeteria the cost adds up. I work in the boonies so spewing pollutants to go out and spend money on food it make less sense than taking what we make.

DSCF0416 - Copy

Having a fair amount of food on hand also serves as insurance. A price spike or sudden unavailability is not impossible. Same with a layoff or other loss of income, foul weather delaying or preventing altogether food deliveries, or other calamities.

DSCF0419 - Copy

We take the same approach with the dogs. In addition to this 20-odd pounds of kibble in the vittles vault there is another unopened bag on hand.

We have several weeks of food on hand for two-and four-footeds, which is more than some people have and less than others. It’s enough to cushion the impact of the likeliest calamities, which is the goal we aim for.