Cooper’s Hawk, again

Patience (and luck) paid off. I was able to capture this beautiful bird just outside my office window as it perched around 6 meters (20 feet) away from me. It was good to see that the eye I thought defective is not.

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Cooper’s Hawk

This Cooper’s Hawk has visited my workplace daily for at least two weeks. When one feeds songbirds, one may also feed other birds.

I have unsuccessfully tried for these past two weeks to get a photo of this bird. Yesterday I was finally able to get this image through my office window.

So I did not notice before now that this bird may have a defective right eye. I will study it more closely to learn if that is the case. If it is indeed the case, that means it does not have binocular vision. If so, it is still an effective hunter.

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Waited

What I believe is a female northern American Kestrel visited this bird feeder. Not the best angle for a photo; the wind blew downwind from it toward me so it oriented that way. It waited a few minutes for an unwary songbird to happen along, then left for other opportunities.

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Silhouetted

A Cooper’s Hawk, viewed against the early sky just outside my workplace on a very cold winter morning.

A photographer’s note: I used a 75-300mm lens at full zoom on autofocus to shoot this through two windows. I was about 20 feet from the hawk, clearly visible to it and was concerned that any more movement on my part would induce it to fly away.

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